Monday, June 27, 2016

13237: Cannes Crap Continued.

AgencySpy posted on the Cannes BBDO Bayer bullshit and noted the following factoid:

JWT CCO Ricardo John, who served as president of the Outdoor jury which awarded the ad, issued his own apology to [Adweek], saying, “The jury, which [included] seven women, did not feel that this campaign, when looked at as a whole, was offensive. Even so, as the jury president, I would like to apologize for those who took it as such.”

Gee, this is getting more pathetic by the minute. First of all, Ricardo John hails from JWT in Brazil, land of the scam ad. JWT and Cannes undoubtedly viewed his jury presidency as a coup for diversity. John’s announcement that the jury awarded a Bronze Lion to an arguably sexist ad—despite featuring seven women jurists—makes Cindy Gallop’s gripe a tad ridiculous. Apparently, adwomen are as culturally clueless as admen. Can’t wait to hear the Cannes Lionesses’ perspective on all of this. Oh, and Bayer is hardly without its own controversies, as evidenced by the advertisement below and 2014 commentary from former Bayer CEO Marijn Dekkers.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

13236: The Scambags At BBDO.

Adweek reported BBDO has withdrawn all Brazilian Bayer ads after a scam ad won a Bronze Lion in the Cannes competition. “I learned last night that one of our very own agencies had a pretty scammy ad in the festival, and it won a Lion,” said BBDO Global Creative Chief David Lubars. “I told them to return it. Because I don’t want that kind of Lion. BBDO doesn’t want that kind of Lion.” Um, there was nothing “scammy” about it. It was a scam ad—pure and simple—as the Brazilian BBDO shop created it exclusively for the award show; plus, the agency paid for the media placement. Cannes has specific policies forbidding the entry and awarding of scam ads, including fuzzy penalties that read as follows:

We believe that banning agencies from entering on a wholesale basis is unfair on blameless individuals. There are many people who work in agencies who may not be involved with an erroneous entry and therefore should not be penalised. Our policy will be to ban the individuals named on the credit list if a scam is discovered.

The length and nature of the ban will be decided based on the seriousness of the case involved. We take the view that not all issues are the same and each case should be dealt with on its own merits.

Of course, the profit-generating machine called Cannes is not about to ban the entire BBDO universe, as it would lead to serious revenue losses. So far, there have been no reports on the banning of a handful of BBDO Brazilians—who were probably surprised to hear from Lubars too. Was it the first time they had ever connected? Did anyone from BBDO have to call the Bayer brass and explain the PR mess was the work of rogue Brazilians? Regardless, it’s funny how the culturally clueless nature of the scam ad is apparently more heinous than the fraudulent factor. An opportunity to promote diverted diversity trumps integrity—both of which trump diversity. Oh, and BBDO probably counts the Brazilians as evidence of its commitment to diversity.

BBDO Withdraws All Brazilian Bayer Ads From Cannes With Apology to Festival and Client

Lubars says AlmapBBDO work was ‘scammy’

By Kristina Monllos, Tim Nudd

CANNES, France—AlmapBBDO, facing criticism for questionable wins at this week’s Cannes Lions, has withdrawn all its Bayer work from the festival at the request of BBDO global creative chief David Lubars.

“I learned last night that one of our very own agencies had a pretty scammy ad in the festival, and it won a Lion,” said Lubars, from the stage of the Debussy Theatre during BBDO’s Cannes Lions session today. “I told them to return it. Because I don’t want that kind of Lion. BBDO doesn’t want that kind of Lion.”

This follows the agency’s apology for its bronze Lion-winning work, which was accused of being sexist, and—per the client’s own description—appears to have been created solely to win awards for the agency.

“All Bayer work created by AlmapBBDO has been withdrawn from the Festival,” a BBDO network spokesman said in a statement. “The work was approved by the local client to be run in Brazil. However, the media was paid for by AlmapBBDO, which contravenes the Cannes entry regulations.”

The spokesman added: “We regret this and apologize to the festival organizers and our client for any embarrassment caused.”

Work for Bayer from the agency included the “.MOV” ad which was one of three ads in a campaign that won a bronze Lion in Outdoor. The agency also submitted a separate campaign that won a bronze Lion in the Print & Publishing category.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

13235: Fast-Talking Wendy Clark.

Adweek published a Cannes interview with DDB CEO Wendy Clark, who blathered on about the need for speed in today’s business environment. Clark also touched on diversity and diverted diversity, announcing all DDB employees will receive “unconscious bias” training by the end of 2016. Plus, the agency is partnering with a consultant specializing in gender equality, whose primary action steps will include auditing the current staff “to help DDB achieve a more balanced workforce within the next year.” Okay, but will DDB publicize the audit results—or will Omnicom continue to hide its EEO-1 data? Clark admitted diversity remains an industry problem and remarked, “Talk is good, but action is way better.” Of course, she didn’t connect the need for speed with the need to address DDB’s dearth of diversity. Heaven forbid diversity should be handled with any sense of urgency.

DDB Global CEO Thinks Agencies Have to Speed Up or Be Left Behind

Wendy Clark says, ‘Talk is good, but action is better’

By Patrick Coffee

CANNES, France—“You have to ask yourself, are agencies changing enough to keep up with this changing marketplace?”

DDB Worldwide CEO Wendy Clark told Adweek that, as major clients like McDonald’s make increasingly strict demands of their advertising partners, all agencies must adapt as quickly as possible or risk being left behind.

“Our models now have to be built for speed. Clients and brands are moving in real-time,” she said, adding, “It has to be efficient [but] we can’t do that at the cost of great work.”

DDB has attempted to balance this contradiction in recent months by introducing a new model called Flex that will allow teams across its 12-office network to collaborate on pieces of business, thereby transcending the sort of multi-agency patchwork that frustrates so many client-side marketers.

Clark is also one of the industry’s most passionate advocates for increased diversity in the agency world. Earlier this week, J. Walter Thompson’s global chairman and CEO Tamara Ingram told Adweek that the conversation around diversity in advertising will continue for the foreseeable future, and Clark agrees—but she also thinks that most agencies have yet to effectively make the transition from talk to action.

“I don’t think we’re seeing enough movement and impact,” Clark said. DDB has now begun to institute “unconscious bias training” as well as partnering with a third-party “gender equity” firm that aims to help DDB achieve a more balanced workforce within the next year.

Will the Omnicom network’s efforts pay off? Clark’s success depends on it.

Friday, June 24, 2016

13234: People In Ivory Towers…

Adweek published an interview with FCB Global CEO Carter Murray where he declared, “You’ve got to have people in charge who actually care about the people, who don’t just talk it but work on it. C-suite people sitting in an ivory tower just trying to make big bonuses and not do much work … it’s pretty hard to survive in this industry being like that in this day in age.” Murray seemed oblivious to the contradictions of making such bold statements while lounging in a swanky Cannes location. Ivory tower exclusivity leads to cultural cluelessness.

FCB Global CEO Says the Age of the ‘Ivory Tower’ Agency Executives Is Over

Carter Murray predicts more tech partnerships to come

By Patrick Coffee

CANNES, France—According to FCB global CEO Carter Murray, the ad industry may well be nearing the end of an era dominated by outsized personalities with titles and pay packages to match.

“You’ve got to have people in charge who actually care about the people, who don’t just talk it but work on it,” he said. “C-suite people sitting in an ivory tower just trying to make big bonuses and not do much work … it’s pretty hard to survive in this industry being like that in this day in age.”

Murray also dismissed those who say the agency business model is dead, telling Adweek that he’s been hearing the same argument for almost 20 years.

That said, the model is changing at the speed of a swipe. As Snapchat and other platforms become ever-larger players in the paid media equation, Murray predicts more deals between agencies, clients and tech companies—many of them presumably made inside gated “secret compounds” like the one Evan Spiegel’s company set up right next to the action at the Palais in Cannes. “You have to partner every year with an exponentially larger number of people,” Murray said.

The festival itself clearly isn’t going anywhere, despite some grumbling about the event serving as more of a cash cow and a corporate showcase than a celebration of creative endeavors. “It’s more intense than it’s ever been,” Murray said, and Cannes will continue to serve as a focal point for global dealmakers, promoters and celebrity exhibitionists in the years to come.

13233: Smoking Weed.

Campaign reported Unilever Chief Marketing Officer Keith Weed declared during a Cannes speech that his company would cease portraying “vacuous” women in advertising, citing research showing women preferred progressive depictions in campaigns. Can’t wait to see how Axe will evolve. After making his bold statements, Weed probably rushed off to the VaynerMedia party.

No more ‘vacuous’ women in ads, says Unilever’s Keith Weed

Unilever has pledged to stamp out female stereotypes in its ads, after finding more progressive campaigns play better with their target audience.

Speaking at Cannes Lions 2016, chief marketing officer Keith Weed unveiled internal Unilever research analysing 1,000 ads from different countries and found 50% contained stereotypical portrayals of women.

This is not a moral issue, it’s an economic issue. We will create better advertising if we create advertising that is more progressive and start challenging those stereotypes

Just 1% conveyed women as funny, 2% showed them as intelligent, and 3% showed them as leaders.

The research examined Unilever’s own advertising output, split into “progressive” and “normative”, and found that the more progressive ads resonated better with audiences. According to Weed, the ads had 12% greater impact, in terms of consumers actively enjoying and feeling involved with the ads.

“These are all big swings,” he said. “This is not a moral issue, it’s an economic issue. We will create better advertising if we create advertising that is more progressive and start challenging those stereotypes.”

Weed described Unilever’s move towards “unstereotyping” after coralling the views of its internal marketers and agencies.

“We are going to start moving in this direction,” he said. “First of all, we’ll look at the role of women in our advertising, and we don’t want women to have a secondary ‘at service’ [role] to product news.

“We want to move to women who are full, authentic and have an aspirational achieving focus.”

Unilever will also challenge “vacuous, blank, agreeable and thin” personality stereotypes, instead moving to three-dimensional portrayals of women.

And finally, it will move away from one advertising view of women, moving to a more “enjoyable”, non-critical reflection of women.

Weed shared images of Sunsilk shampoo, popular in Asia, which featured images of a woman wearing a headscarf.

Weed acknowledged the gender stereotyping of men in advertising, but said Unilever would focus on women as its target audience is predominantly female.

His comments come a year after the launch of the Glass Lion at Cannes, which is awarded to campaigns that fight gender stereotypes.

Unilever has yet to be nominated for a campaign, with rival P&G this year picking up a nomination for its Persil India ‘Share the load’ campaign, and last year winning a gong for the Always ‘Like a Girl’ spot.

There was only one nomination from the UK for this year’s Glass Lion category, for AMV BBDO’s Guinness spot, featuring gay rugby player Gareth Thomas.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

13232: Gallop’s Goofy Gripe.

Adweek reported Cindy Gallop complained about the Bayer advertisement depicted above, calling it a nasty example of the work created by our “male-dominated ad industry” and awarded by “male-dominated juries.” Okay, but earlier in the week when Gallop was hyping her Make Love Not Porn bullshit, she declared, “So, please film the sex you’re having at Cannes, and it will transform you and your sex lives!” Plus, how does Gallop know the headline isn’t quoting a female?

Cindy Gallop Calls Out ‘Male-Dominated Ad Industry’ for Giving This Ad a Bronze Lion at Cannes

Work from Bayer, AlmapBBDO

By Kristina Monllos

Cannes Lions has its second cringeworthy moment, this time from a Bronze Lion winner.

The outdoor ad, for Bayer from AlmapBBDO in Sao Paulo, reads “Don’t worry babe, I’m not filming this.mov” and features aspirin boxes.

Cindy Gallop, the former agency exec and vocal women’s advocate, has again brought attention to Cannes Lions ceremony tweeting a photo of the ad and commenting, “Don’t use this to sell aspirin, male-dominated ad industry [and] don’t award it, male dominated juries.”

“We have asked that BBDO discontinue any further use, dissemination or promotion of this campaign,” said a spokesman for Bayer.

He added, “The concept was presented to our local marketing team in Brazil by BBDO as one of several campaigns that the agency intended to submit for this year’s Cannes Lions festival. In order to meet the requirements for submission to Cannes, BBDO paid for limited placement in Brazil. Bayer has not advertised Aspirin through any channel in Brazil for several years.”

A group of female Brazilian creatives brought the ad to Gallop’s attention, who according to Gallop, were “very unhappy about it, particularly given this very recent, high-profile and utterly appalling case in Brazil.” The Brazilian case referenced deals with a 16-year-old girl who was allegedly gang raped by 30 men who also took pictures of her and posted them on social media without her consent.

“Work like this is still being approved and awarded because our industry and especially creative leadership, creative departments and creative awards juries are dominated by men,” said Gallop.

Gallop added: “I am regularly contacted by both women and right-thinking men in our industry, who share with me things that need calling out but which they are too afraid to call out themselves for fear of retaliation (rightly so—I also regularly get stories of such retaliation).”

The Bronze Lion was awarded to AlmapBBDO for three outdoor ads, including the one reference in the tweet as well as two other iterations; “It’s ok, I’m not taking any notes.doc” and “Relax, it’s not like this is being recorded.mp3.”

A spokesman for BBDO referred Adweek to Bayer for comment.

13231: Off The Wall With 180LA.

AgencySpy spotlighted a spot for 360FLY by 180LA that is 110% culturally clueless. If anyone is wondering how such a mess could ever get out of an agency without being questioned, well, just view the 180LA leadership exclusivity.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

13230: Self-Seeking & Selfishness.

Adweek reported the Cannes Lionesses are seeking the “original Peggy Olsons” at Cannes. “We’re trying to find the first Lionesses, the original Peggy Olsons,” purred a Cannes Lioness. “Cannes has an amazing archive, but the data on female creatives doesn’t go that far back. They started in 1954, but [information about female creatives] from that date isn’t available. So we’re going to have to do a proper bit of detective work to find out who the original Lioness was.” Yes, let’s salute all the noble White women who blazed trails and—like their White male perpetrators/counterparts—completely ignored the people of color facing far more discrimination. Maybe the next sleuthing will uncover the original Dawn Chambers and Hollis.

2 Female Agency Creatives Are Trying to Track Down the ‘Original Peggy Olsons’ at Cannes

Finding the first Lionesses

By Kristina Monllos

Last year, after winning their first Cannes Lion, a pair of creatives from Mcgarrybowen in London, Holly Fallows and Charlotte Watmough, started a movement called Cannes Lionesses to champion female creatives at Cannes. This year, the women are back, and they’re on a mission to find the first female creative winner of the Cannes Gold Lion.

“We’re trying to find the first Lionesses, the original Peggy Olsons,” Fallows told Adweek. “Cannes has an amazing archive, but the data on female creatives doesn’t go that far back. They started in 1954, but [information about female creatives] from that date isn’t available. So we’re going to have to do a proper bit of detective work to find out who the original Lioness was.”

Fallows added, “We want to create this definitive list [of female creative Cannes Lions winners] from 1954 to 2016 so that we get this archive of amazing female creative talent that are winning awards. It’s to inspire people, really.”

During their time at Cannes this year, the duo is conducting interviews with past Cannes Lionesses including Grey’s Vicki Maguire, and Saatchi & Saatchi’s Kate Stanners and Rosie Arnold.

“We’ve set up loads of interviews with past winners, and we’re going to track down the winners from this year and interview them so the website can be more of a source of inspiration and motivation,” said Fallows.

Fallows and Watmough are also hoping anyone who knows of or has information about the first Cannes Lioness will reach out to them. They’re using the hashtag #canneslionesses on social media to spread their message.

“We were obviously aware that there’s a gender imbalance in the industry, but within our agency, it’s never been an issue,” said Fallows. “Winning the award made us realize, when we saw everyone walk up on stage and there weren’t any females, that’s when the penny dropped.”

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

13229: Cannes Lionesses And Liars.

Campaign published a call-to-arms from Cannes Lionesses—an example of diverted diversity worthy of a Glass Lion. Or an ADCOLOR® Award, at least. “The lack of senior female creative blights the industry and affects the work,” declared the Cannes Lionesses. “Without them the work simply does not represent the diversity demanded by today’s society. And that’s not what our clients want or what our consumers need.” Of course, the womanifesto does not extend its convictions to racial and ethnic diversity. Given that the predominately White women comprising the organization have likely done little to nothing to promote real diversity throughout their careers, this grand endeavor seems a tad narcissistic and hypocritical. The Lions and Lionesses could benefit from inviting a few Black Panthers too.

Cannes Lionesses hunt first females to take on the Lions

A lot of heat — but not a lot of light — has been generated by the gender diversity debate in advertising.

It is right for us as an industry to bemoan the lack of agency female representation, particularly in creative departments.

But we must do more

The lack of senior female creative blights the industry and affects the work. Without them the work simply does not represent the diversity demanded by today’s society. And that’s not what our clients want or what our consumers need.

The time has come to point out the obvious and truly celebrate female creativity; to ram home the reasons as to just why it is vital that the industry is more gender representative; to inspire the women who we hope will follow in our footsteps in ever increasing numbers.

On the prowl

Too few of us consider a career in creative, put off, perhaps, by its reputation as a “Mad Men” all boys club instead of championing our inner Peggy Olsons. Too many find it a struggle too far to clamber up the industry’s greasy pole and land those coveted senior creative roles. It’s not about tokenism; about employing or promoting women for women’s sake. It is more, much more, than that — about realising that an industry with too few senior females on board is missing out on so much. With more women that matter involved in creating advertising, the creative bar is set higher for everyone, men, women, clients, agencies and — ultimately — the consumer.

So where better to lead the charge than at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the world’s most prestigious and publicised celebration of advertising (and more)?

For the second year running, two creatives at Mcgarrybowen London are proud to host the Cannes Lionesses — a website that celebrates and champions female creativity.

This year we’re going large — broadening and expanding the site to get even more women involved in the conversation.

Striking gold

By shining a light on brilliant and award-wining creativity we hope to shift the dial from the 267 female Cannes Lions winners last year (from a pool of thousands) to something rather more representative.

Our mission, in fact, is to seek out those first ever female creatives to strike Cannes gold.

The ambition of the website www.canneslionesses.com is to document all of the Cannes Lionnesses to have picked up metal from the festival’s launch in 1954 to the present day.

We will film this year’s crop of female Cannes winners and are sharing interviews with high profile winners from previous years and from across the globe.

Grey’s Vicki Maguire, Kate Stanners of Saatchi & Saatchi and Rosie Arnold, soon to join AMV BBDO from BBH, are among the (too few) female luminaries to be involved from the UK.

By offering advice and career tips to today and tomorrow’s crop of female creatives we hope to inspire women to push for their rightful places at Adland’s top tables.

But we can’t do it alone. We want — need — the advertising and wider marketing industries (including, yes, men) to join the conversation by using the hashtag #canneslionesses on social channels. We need them to get their rolodex out, ask their old boss to search out the first female Lions winners from back in the day and help us make the list complete.

You can also find Cannes Lionesses on Instagram and Twitter. Come on Cannes, help us roar!