Saturday, August 06, 2011

9137: Draftfcb Checks Out Of Hampton Inn.

Adweek reported the Hampton Inn account is going into creative review, and incumbent Draftfcb will not be defending. Howard Draft once admitted he’d prefer to be running a small shop. Given the agency’s recent and impending losses, it looks like he’s making his wish come true.

Hampton Inn Launches Creative Review

Incumbent Draftfcb not defending

By Andrew McMains

Hilton Hotels has launched a review of its Hampton Inn creative account, with annual revenue estimated at $2 million.

Incumbent Draftfcb in Chicago is not defending. As a result, the agency will lose its last piece of Hilton business. The Hampton Inn split comes four months after Homewood Suites left and three years after the exit of Doubletree.

In a statement, the agency attributed the latest split to “philosophical differences,” adding, “The financial impact on our agency will be minimal.” The Interpublic Group agency had worked on the brand since 2003. Hampton Inn could not be reached late Friday afternoon.

Draftfcb’s Hilton divorce comes just a week after S.C. Johnson ended its 58-year relationship with the agency. That split, however, is much more painful, given that SCJ was a global account and supplied $50-60 million in revenue. The agency’s Chicago office steered the business and will have to make deep cuts as a result. That office now employs about 1,000 staffers.

Other top clients at Draftfcb Chicago include MillerCoors (Coors, Coors Light, and Miller Lite), Kmart, Volkswagen (direct marketing), and Coca-Cola (shopper marketing). The office also works on Beiersdorf, Draftfcb’s largest global account.

Historically, Hilton has considered both roster and non-roster agencies for its various hotel assignments. Other roster shops include Publicis in New York (Hilton, Hilton Honors), BBDO in Atlanta (Embassy Suites) and Laird + Partners in New York (Doubletree).

Hampton Inn’s media spending totaled about $19 million last year, up from more than $17 million in 2009, according to Nielsen. Those figures don’t include online spending.

No comments: